Cover

A Flower Blooms

 

 

Members of the EU Commission stood round as the New Briton flag was raised; correspondingly the EU flag was lowered.

Briton, a new country, was “at last” free. EU troops were departing after oppressing for several years an insurgency.

The new country was poor; two world wars and several Middle East wars had depleted its treasury.

Its economic future was bleak. Unlike some African nations it had no mineral wealth and few other natural resources.

Its industrial infrastructure was old and in need of repair.

 

Bravely the new Prime Minister stepped forward.

Madam Bay gave a rousing speech on new beginnings and opportunities but this disguised the fact that business was leaving and exports falling.

The subsidies from the EU were being cut off.

Foreign businessmen like circling wolves sensed the weakness - they were ready to step in and use the country as a cheap tax base then set up gambling and money laundering. Few were planning manufacturing.

The New Briton economy was too unstable for manufacturers to invest.

These entrepreneurs were in service industries, mobile industries that moved electronically - a whiff of problems and they would be off.

 

Prime Minister Bay was aware that she had a large population and a low income generating economy.

Years of mismanagement of the oil industry had led to the disappearance of any permanent fund to restructure. In contrast Norway had built up a war chest of billions to help it beyond peak oil.

There was, she knew, no golden bullet. This new country would have to establish itself.

If its rulers were

Imprint

Publisher: BookRix GmbH & Co. KG

Text: alastair macleod
Images: alastair macleod: scots thistle in bloom, authors own photo.
Editing/Proofreading: alastair macleod
Translation: cover typeset in effloresce
Publication Date: 02-28-2017
ISBN: 978-3-7438-0001-4

All Rights Reserved

Dedication:
To the future. The story, all names, characters, and incidents portrayed in this story are fictitious. No identification with actual persons (living or deceased), places, buildings, and products is intended or should be inferred.

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